Recipes

Braised beef with chilli & vinegar

Braising meat on the bone gives so much more flavour to the final product, but you could also do this recipe with diced beef shin, or any other cut good for braising. If braising on the bone, ask your butcher to cut from the middle of the shin.

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 2kg piece beef shin, on the bone
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 1 large brown onion, diced
  • 1 piece star anise
  • 1 stick cinnamon
  • 6 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • ¾ cup Shaoxing wine*
  • 2 tbsp Chinese light soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp Chinese dark soy sauce
  • 1 cup Chinkiang black vinegar*
  • 50g rock sugar, crushed
  • 1 1/2 tbsp chilli bean paste
  • 2 cups chicken stock
  • Coriander and crispy-fried onions, to serve

Method

Preheat the oven to 160°C.

Add oil to a deep frying pan big enough to fit the beef shin and place on a medium-low heat.

Season the shin with salt then add to the pan. Colour on all sides until golden brown, about 5-7 minutes. Remove from the pan and reserve. Add onion, star anise and cinnamon to the pan. Sweat for about 5 minutes, then add garlic and cook for a few more minutes.

Add Shaoxing wine, scraping the bottom of the pan, then add both soy sauces, black vinegar, sugar and chilli bean paste. Bring to the boil, then simmer for 2 minutes. Add stock, bring to a simmer, then check seasoning.

Transfer the beef shin into a casserole dish or heavy-bottomed oven tray. Carefully add sauce – it should cover half to three-quarters up the shin (add a little boiling water if needed), then cover tightly with foil or a lid. Cook in the oven for 6 hours, until the beef falls off the bone easily.

Remove from the oven, allow to sit for 20 minutes. Carefully transfer the shin and sauce to a deep serving platter. Garnish with coriander and crispy-fried onions and serve.

NOTES: Want something to drink?
Try the M. Chapoutier Rasteau Côtes du Rhône 2012, Rhône Valley, France.

This blend of grenache, shiraz and mourvèdre is the perfect foil for the rich flavours of the slow-cooked beef. It displays a perfect balance of elegance and power, medium-palate weight and mouth-filling vibrant fruit. Aromas of violets and dark berries lead to a palate full of interest, with just the right amount of spice.

First published in the Good Weekend.
THE ROCKPOOL FILES